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Saffron makes you happy. Scientifically proven.

For many years I am using several Amanprana products. My all-time favorites are Kotobuki Matcha, Gula Java Cacao, Gula Java Safran, Coconut Oil, Botanico Mix and Razoli.

Marco Zielinski, Geschäftsführer, Rhino's energy GmbH, Germany

Saffron compared to lavender, St John's wort and Prozac

In comparison with St John’s wort it has been scientifically proven that saffron as an anti-depressant is more efficient and less light sensitive. Saffron also has less interaction with other medicines (doesn’t fight the same enzymes in the body to allow medicines to do their work). When it comes to its calming effect and the aid it can be in helping you fall asleep, saffron is more effective than lavender.

One of the Iranian scientific centres which carries out research into saffron, is led by Shahin Akhondzadeh of the Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital in Teheran University. The university centre carries out research into the use of different medicines and herbs to combat psychological disorders, addictions to painkillers and epilepsy. The clinical findings suggest that saffron is a safe and effective antidepressant. In a randomised, double-blind study 30 mg of saffron extract (in capsules) was administered each day over a period of six weeks. The result was a significant reduction in depression in comparison to placebo patients and without side effects (1).
This research followed on from a double-blind study for the treatment of depression in which the same amount of saffron was compared to the medicine Imipramine (2). In the past saffron was compared to the medicine Fluoxetine (better known under the brand name Prozac). This study demonstrated that saffron was just as good as medicine in the treatment of both depression and epilepsy (3). Pharmacological studies in Iran (4) and Japan (5, 6) confirm the anti-epileptic effect of saffron.

Sources:
Akhondzadeh S, et al., Comparison of Crocus sativus and imipramine in the treatment of mild to moderate depression: a pilot double-blind randomized trial, Biomed Central Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2004; 4(1): 12.

  1. Noorbala AA, Hydro-alcoholic extract of Crocus sativus versus fluoxetine in the treatment of mild to moderate depression: a double-blind, randomized pilot trial, Journal of Ethnopharmacology 2005; 97(2): 281–284
  2. Hosseinzadeh H and Khosravan V, Anticonvulsant effects aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Crocus sativus stigmas in mice, Archives of Iranian Medicine 2002; 5: 44–47.
  3. Abe K, Saito H, Effects of saffron extract and its constituent crocin on learning behavior and long-term Potentiation, Phytother Res. 2000; 14: 149–52.
  4. Zhang Y, Shoyama Y, Sugiura M, Saito H, Effect of Crocus sativus on the ethanol-induced impairment of passive avoidance performances in mice, Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin 1994; 17: 217–221.
  5. Escribano J, et al., Crocin, safranal and picrocrocin from saffron (Crocus sativus) inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro, Cancer Letters 1996; 100 (1–2): 23–30.
Other sources
Akhondzadeh S, Tahmacebi-Pour N, Noorbala AA, et al. Crocus sativus L. in the treatment of mild to moderate depression: a double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial. Phytother Res. 2005;19(2):148-151.
Noorbala AA, Akhondzadeh S, Tahmacebi-Pour N, Jamshidi AH. Hydro-alcoholic extract of Crocus sativus L. versus fluoxetine in the treatment of mild to moderate depression: a double-blind, randomized pilot trial. J Ethnopharmacol. 2005;97(2):281-284.
Moshiri E, Basti AA, Noorbala AA, Jamshidi AH, Hesameddin Abbasi S, Akhondzadeh S. Crocus sativus L. (petal) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate depression: a double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial. Phytomedicine. 2006;13(9-10):607-611.
Akhondzadeh Basti A, Moshiri E, Noorbala AA, Jamshidi AH, Abbasi SH, Akhondzadeh S. Comparison of petal of Crocus sativus L. and fluoxetine in the treatment of depressed outpatients: a pilot double-blind randomized trial.
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2007;31(2):439-442.
Braden R, Reichow S, Halm MA. The use of the essential oil lavandin to reduce preoperative anxiety in surgical patients. J Perianesth Nurs. 2009;24(6):348-355.
Nord D, Belew J. Effectiveness of the essential oils lavender and ginger in promoting children's comfort in a perianesthesia setting. J Perianesth Nurs. 2009;24(5):307-312.
Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Graham JE, Malarkey WB, Porter K, Lemeshow S, Glaser R. Olfactory influences on mood and autonomic, endocrine, and immune function. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008;33(3):328-339.
Gula Java Safran
Gula Java Safran
  • Feel well + energy
  • Slow Food saffron of the best quality (ISO 1), Jiloca, Spain
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When it comes to its calming effect and the aid it can be in helping you fall asleep, saffron is more effective than lavender Saffron makes you happy, scientifically proven